Monday, December 5, 2011

Fur and Wool Ban Not Popular


November 30, 2011
A Cool Reception to a Ban on Fur
By IAN LOVETT - NYTimes.com
WEST HOLLYWOOD, Calif.
FUR is everywhere on the high fashion row of Melrose Avenue. It lines jackets on the mannequins in John Varvatos, dangles from scarves in the windows of Kitson, and drapes from hangers at Maxfield. Even on a 75-degree day in November, fur remains very much in season here.
And in the last week, these swanky window displays have become something of a political statement, a symbol of resistance to an ordinance that was passed Nov. 21 making this city the first in the country to ban the sale of fur apparel.
While boutiques here prepare for the ban to take effect in September 2013, Melrose Avenue may offer an early reading on the future of fur in the fashion industry: Even as animal rights activists declare victory, designers and storeowners have reiterated their commitment to fur’s place in high fashion, warning that shoppers will simply take their business outside of West Hollywood.
At the boutiques along Melrose Avenue, sales clerks scoffed at the idea that fur was falling out of fashion. One called the ban “ridiculous,” another said it was “super annoying.” Far from beginning to clear fur from their shelves, store owners are instead talking about clearing out of the city.     Read More
You'd be hard pressed to find anyone that believes West Hollywood, CA would represent the views of mainstream America.  This ban on fur and wool has gone so far though that even many of the people that live and work there feel that it's ridiculous.  Livestock and even wild animals provide us with many significant resources.  When it comes to the fur from wild animals, it's necessary for us to manage their populations appropriately anyhow so we might as well utilize the resources they provide us rather than waste them.  
Interestingly enough, these people even banned the sale of wool in this ordinance.  Giving a sheep a haircut once a year hardly matches the cruelty that PETA, HSUS and other anti-agriculture group would like you to believe.  -Troy



2 comments:

Anonymous said...

We raise alpacas for the fiber they produce. A natural, renewable resource. Not shearing them once a year would be doing the animal more harm than good. Not shearing would cause them to overheat much faster, stress, matting and tangling of the fiber etc. What people don't realize and understand about rasing and caring for animals is amazing.

Terry Ward said...

"When it comes to the fur from feral housecats, it's necessary for us to manage their populations appropriately anyhow so we might as well utilize the resources they provide us rather than waste them..shucks, think of all the starving people in China who would LOVE our excess catmeat"